Current Research Projects

Dr David Jessop
Dr David Jessop
Post-Doctoral Fellow, LMV-UBC

Why do pyroclastic density currents occur?

Subduction zones, and hence arc volcanism, produce the most cataclysmic and devastating eruptions (e.g. Soufrierre Hills, 1997, Pinatubo, 1991, Mt. St. Helens, 1980). These explosive eruptions of silicic magma are surface expressions of the processes that occur during the life cycle of an arc volcano, often producing jet-like eruption columns that may undergo gravitational collapse to produce pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), or loft material several tens of kilometres and spread out as an ash cloud...MORE


Dr Emily Mullen
Dr Emily Mullen
Post-Doctoral Fellow, LMV-UBC

Characterization of magmatism at the termination of an arc: A case study of the Northern Cascades, British Columbia, Canada

The Northern Cascade Arc and Cordilleran Volcanic Province are understudied regions with little information on eruptive products. Therefore it is not currently possible to determine patterns defined by magmas at the termination of the arc. This study will acquire new geochemical and geochronologic data for magmas from these regions...MORE


Mr Yannick Le Moigne
Mr Yannick Le Moigne
Ph.D. candidate, SFU-LMV

Investigating Canada’s deadliest volcanic eruption and mitigating future hazards, Tseax volcano, BC

Tseax volcano is a small cinder cone in NW British Columbia and the site of a 32 km long lava flow constituting one of the youngest volcanic eruptions in Canada (mid-1700s). The eruption caused ~ 2000 fatalities among the Nisga’a First Nations living nearby and is Canada’s second worst natural disaster. The rich oral history of the Nisga’a First Nation describes the lava flow event and suggests that the fatalities may have been the result of “poison smoke”. Other scenarios have also been suggested, which motivates the aim of this project: to investigate the nature of the Tseax eruption from a multidisciplinary approach in an attempt to offer possible explanations for Canada’s second worst natural disaster...MORE


Mr Gioachino Roberti
Mr Gioachino Roberti
Ph.D. candidate, LMV-SFU

How does uplift and glacial erosion influence the stability and longevity of volcanic edifices?

It is well known that changes in the height, composition and structure of a volcanic edifice through growth, eruption or erosion can influence whether and when an eruption might occur through their effects on the crustal stress regime. Furthermore, depending on the rate of change of crustal stresses, periodic forcings from alpine glaciations, global glaciations and climate change can influence the frequency, composition and spatial distribution of volcanism....MORE


Miss Swetha Venugopal
Miss Swetha Venugopal
Ph.D. candidate, SFU-LMV

Magmatic volatile fluxes through two subduction zones: The Canadian Cascades & the Lesser Antilles

Volatile elements are transferred from the Earth’s mantle to the atmosphere and arc volcanoes represent their most efficient transfer mechanism. Degassing at volcanoes and hydrothermal activity are the link between the deep Earth and the surface. Indeed, at active volcanoes (e.g., La Soufrière, Guadeloupe), gas and heat transfer from deep magma reservoirs to shallow aquifers will sustain hydrothermal activity and can lead to pressurisation and eventual explosive eruptions...MORE


Mr Alexander Wilson
Mr Alexander Wilson
Ph.D. candidate, UBC-LMV

GLACIOVOLCANISM IN THE GARIBALDI VOLCANIC BELT

Glaciovolcanism is the interaction of volcanism with ice in all of its forms, including any melt water that is created by volcanic heating. Glaciovolcanic edifices have distinctive morphologies and deposits indicative of ice enclosure or contact. Mapping these edifices is of great significance to climatological science as they establish the paleo-presence of ice and can be used to constrain the thickness and age of ancient cordilleran ice sheets...MORE